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Visualbee Presents Presentation Fundamentals

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Presentations are something that we’re all familiar with. Whether you are watching a presentation or giving a presentation, chances are you know what is good and what is not. While VIsualbee gives you a great platform to create your presentation, there are a few fundamentals that need to be kept in mind.

Don’t abuse your visuals – Usually your visuals are posters, charts, or even a PowerPoint presentation. Whatever your visuals may be, keep them simple and don’t put too many words on them. The audience isn’t there to read your slides, they are there to listen to you present.

Look at the audience – If you ever wondered where you should be looking when presenting, the answer is right in front of you. Don’t just single out one person, but instead try to make eye contact with numerous people throughout the room. If you don’t do this then you aren’t engaging the audience, you are just talking to yourself. This can result in an utter lack of attention from your audience.

Show your personality – It doesn’t matter if you are presenting to a corporate crowd or to senior citizens, you need to show some character when presenting. If you don’t do this you’ll probably sound like Agent Smith from the Matrix. Nobody wants to hear him present. (If you do, you are probably an agent yourself and we will find you)

Make them laugh – Although you want to educate your audience, you need to make them laugh as well. I learned this from Guy Kawasaki and if you ever hear any of his speeches you’ll understand why. In essence, it keeps the audience alert and they’ll learn more from you than someone who just educates.

Talk to your audience, not at them – People hate it when they get talked at, so don’t do it. You need to interact with your audience and create a conversation. An easy way to do this is to ask them questions as well as letting them ask you questions.

Be honest – A lot of people present to the audience what they want to hear, instead of what they need to hear. Make sure you tell the truth even if they don’t want to hear it because they will respect you for that and it will make you more human.

Don’t over prepare – If you rehearse your presentation too much it will sound like it (in a bad way). Granted, you need to be prepared enough to know what you are going to talk about but make sure your presentation flows naturally instead of sounding memorized. Usually if you ask experienced speakers what you shouldn’t do, they’ll tell you not to rehearse your presentation too much because then it won’t sound natural.

Show some movement – You probably know that you need to show some movement when speaking, but naturally you may forget to do so. Make sure you show some gestures or pace around a bit (not too much) on the stage when speaking. Remember, no one likes watching a stiff. People are more engaged with an animated speaker.

Watch what you say – You usually don’t notice when you say “uhm”, “ah”, or any other useless word frequently, but the audience does. It gets quite irritating; so much that some members of the audience will probably count how many times you say these useless words.

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Differentiate yourself – If you don’t do something unique compared to all the other presenters the audience has heard, they won’t remember you. You are branding yourself when you speak, so make sure you do something unique and memorable.

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Designing Your Presentation The VisualBee Way

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While Visualbee can help you to add imagery and structure to your slides to help give you a platform to getting started, there are still tips that go beyond te deign of slides per say. These tips can be listed below

1. Treat Your Audience as King

Your audience is a king. They come to a presentation because they need it.

Design your presentation to meet your audience needs, not just yours. Audiences want to know what is important to them. That’s why you should create a clear, simple and easy to understand presentation.

2. Spread Ideas and Move People

Audiences want to get inspiration from your presentation. They also want to benefit from your thinking. Remember, presentation is not another meeting that gets people bored. It should be able to convey meaning.

Use animation to inspire and help audience understand your message better. Encourage them to act.

3. Help Them See What You Are Saying

A picture is worth a thousand words.

When making a presentation design, ask yourself, what am I trying to communicate?

Brainstorm ideas and replace words with pictures, charts or diagrams. Design a presentation that has a consistent appearance so that every slide will be focused on one single idea. This will help your audience easier to understand what you are saying. Don’t let their attention distracted by puzzling slides.

4. Practice Design Not Decoration

Design is different from decoration.

You are making a good design if you arrange every element consciously for specific communication objectives. Make sure that there is no picture, diagram or text, placed randomly without any purpose.

A design is very different from decoration. Decoration is only an act of adding something to decorate your slides. Unfortunately, often times it makes a presentation slide become complicated and confusing.

90% of a creative process is destructive. This means you need to reduce in order to get the essence of your message.

If you want to display a strong message, focus your statement on specific sentence that represent the main point of your presentation.

And if you want to display a powerful image, enlarge it to show its strength.

5. Cultivate Healthy Relationships

As a presenter, you are interacting with your slides and your audience. Build a good relationship with your audience and reduce your dependency on slides. Remove unnecessary text and focus on main subject.

Your slide serves as a visual communication to your audience.

Extend this function with your style of delivering the presentation. Make eye contact and use a friendly body language. This will develop trust and healthy relationships between you and your audience.

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Practice a lot before you perform. Practice and repetition are very important. It will help you mastering your presentation better and cultivate healthy relationship.

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Presentations are a great way to convey ideas and messages as well as educate and convince people. Giving a presentation is not an easy task. It requires a considerable amount of research, organization, public speaking skills, and self-confidence. A good presenter has the proficiency to engage his or her listeners from beginning to end and compel them to take action. Here are some useful tips and tricks presented by Visualbee for effective presentations:

 

For Organizing Your Presentation:

          Divide the body of your presentation into four to five main points.

          The conclusion should be a summary of all the main points of the presentation and it should leave the audience with something that is worth remembering.

          Include questions in your presentation, which should be asked once every 15 minutes to engross the audience.

          The final slide should contain a message thanking the audience, your contact details and other information.

For Good Public Speaking:

          Use anecdotes and practical examples to make ideas and concepts more coherent.

          Speak in varying tones to give emphasis to certain words and ideas.

          Deliver your speech slowly and clearly.

          Maintain an upright but relaxed posture while you are speaking.

          When gesturing, make sure that it is natural and extemporaneous.

          Maintain an eye contact with the audience.

          Wear clothes with simple cuts and neutral tones, and make sure that they are comfortable.

For good presentation design:

          Do not overload your slides with too much text and content.

          Prepare a Table of Contents slide with the “Summary Slide” feature.

          Arrange slides according to the topics.

          Font size for subtitles should be 24 to 32, with bold font.

          Use dark font over light background and light font over dark background to enhance clarity.

          Use graphics only when appropriate and don’t make them too flashy.

 

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Succeed At Your Presentation: Visualbee Tips

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We have all noticed speakers with unconscious habits such as adjusting their clothes, playing with their ring, or playing with their fingers while speaking or giving a presentation. When you're giving a presentation or speaking in public, you should avoid doing anything that might be considered distracting, annoying, or offensive by your audience. Also, your PowerPoint presentation if gone wrong can turn out to be a big mistake of your career. So what exactly should you not do? Here is Visualbee to guide you through it:

DO NOT Read Your Slides To The Audience:

It is possible to listen and read at the same time, though it is not possible to talk about something else, while reading out loud at the same time. This signifies that your audience will have already read whatever is on your slide before you do. There is no need to make your audience re-hear what they have already read. Use your slides to emphasize or prove your point, not to deliver them. Put your notes and what to read aloud on the presenter view. You’ll seem more knowledgeable when you cite something that isn’t up on the slide.

DO NOT Clutter up your slides:

With PowerPoint it is very easy to add graphics, videos, animations, fonts, WordArt, sounds, graphs, boxes, bullets, colours, backgrounds, transitions. With all of the great new features it is very easy to clutter up a slide with so much wiz and bang that your audience will never be able to absorb it all, let alone appreciate your point. Use the PowerPoint Slide Rule of 3+1+1. You can have up to 3 different elements on any one slide plus one “background” item plus one flash item.

DO NOT use Worthless Graphics, Images, Graphs, WordArt, SmartArt, etc.:

PowerPoint comes loaded with a lot of amazing ways to brighten up your presentation with Do not, under penalty of mockery, use unrelated visuals on your slides just to make them look less dull. Make your images count. A picture is worth a thousand words, take advantage. Always use graphical elements as “proof.” Visualbee helps you with such tasks by selecting the right images for your slides.

DO NOT Use Wrong Hand Gestures:

Arms folded across Your Chest, hands folded across your body, hands behind your back, hands on your hips, hands in your pockets are some hand gestures that give the impression that you are nervous and fidgeting. Folding your arms just doesn't look good. It suggests to people that you're closed off.

These were some of the most important DO NOTS one must remember while delivering presentations. Keep watching this space for more tips to improve your presentation skills.

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We previously presented a great collection of influential presentations in this section of our blog. By now, you must have already got a good idea of how to create creditable and impactful presentations. In this section we bring to you a few more such presentations to inspire you for your own ones. Use Visualbee and your presentations will be just as good or perhaps even better than these ones:

Get Rich Quick:

http://www.slideshare.net/NowPosible/get-rich-quick-25310436

A very short and sweet presentation, the content keeps you moving. The presentation is in black and white but the pictures and the display make it a very unique one. There is no problem of glazed over eyes here.

Live On The Edge:

Here is another edgy and impactful presentation. Three words ‘help this person’ can transform a routine existence into a life bursting with rich details. They can transform your life, career and perspective. This presentation does not use many pictures but the contrasting text and background colour and size makes it interesting.

Five Writing Tips That Double Your Salary:

A useful and fantastic presentation which is direct and spot on. This is how every presentation should be- ‘to the point’. There is so much useful advice in such a tremendously short presentation. Conciseness is the soul of wit. The importance of pictures is clearly depicted in this presentation. This is how your presentation will turn out to be if you use a tool like Visualbee. 

5 Things I Wish I Knew Before Starting Up

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Here is a short and crisp presentation to help you to avoid some common mistakes while starting up. It is a simple and straightforward presentation. It very meticulously explains that there are so many new things to master when starting a business, that it becomes overwhelming. The presentation uses thoughtful words and provides experiential wisdom to adhere to .A good play of font makes the presentation an eye catching one.

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Visualbee's Guide Notes on Presentation Making

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Giving a presentation is a huge and scary responsibility. You are the only one who can avoid boredom by PowerPoint for your audience. Most of us often get stuck you’re your presentations because we are not sure how to go about it. Thankfully, several tips, tools, and other resources provided by Visualbee can help you take your slides up a notch and make them more professional and captivating. Visualbee presents to you a step by step guide you can go through every time you get stuck with your presentation 

Organise your presentation beforehand:

The best way to avoid getting stuck up is planning your presentation beforehand. Plan everything you want to include in your presentation. Work on your speech and slides beforehand to avoid last minute problems and panic.

The first slide:

The first slide should announce the title of your presentation, the event and date, and your name and position. Many speakers miss off some of this basic information and then weeks later the audience is not clear who made the presentation or when. You should try to make the title catchy, so that you immediately have the interest of your audience. A challenging question works well or you can use the play of words.

The second slide:

The second slide should capture the attention of your audience. It could be the main scheme of your presentation or some conventional idea that you wish to challenge or a relevant or witty quote from a leader in your field. If it is amusing or controversial or both, it will just add spice to your presentation.

The third slide:

The third slide should set out the structure of your presentation. The default structure should consist of all the themes that you intend to discuss.

• Each theme should be the subject of a small number of slides:

 A good working idea is that three slides for each theme are about right.

• Each slide should have a clear and relevant heading:

 A question is often a good way of winning attention - but, in that case, make sure you answer the question in the body of the slide.

• Each slide should contain around 25-35 words:

Unless it is a quote or contains an illustration, use limited text. Too many words and your audience will have problems reading the material. Too few words and you're likely to be flashing through the slides and spending too much time clicking the mouse.

• Make appropriate use of pictures:

It's a very clever idea to break up text with illustrations and we all very well know a picture is worth a thousand words.

• Make appropriate use of anecdotes:

A short story or case study will act as an effective illustration of a point. Add life to your presentation so people remember it.

The last slide:

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The last slide should display all the necessary contact details which must include e-mail address plus the web site, Facebook page and Twitter address of your organisation and any other personal website or blog if you own one.

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1) Understand Your Audience's Sacrifice

Think about it: if you're speaking to 100 people for an hour, you're consuming 100 hours of time. This is time your audience could be spending at the office, with their families, catching up with friends, or working on other projects. So before you utter your first word on stage, understand what your audience has given up for you, and make sure you've invested an equal amount of time in preparation to make their time worthwhile and well spent.

2) Be Infotaining

Teaching isn't enough. Yes, your audience wants to learn, but in order to soak up all the knowledge you're giving them, they need to be interested and paying attention. This is why it's important to incorporate some humor and a compelling story into your presentation. In other words, you need to inform your audience in an entertaining way: be infotaining. Furthermore, be personable. Tell personal stories, mention your pets, and mention your kids; find a way to make a personal connection with the audience to keep them engaged.

3) Work the Room

Don't stand in one spot on the stage for the whole presentation. On the other hand, don't walk around so much that it's distracting. Instead, before you begin your talk, pick 4-6 people who are spread out randomly throughout the audience. Then do your best to speak to each of these people during your presentation. This will help you naturally walk around the stage and address all portions of the audience, making everyone in the room feel like they're a part of your presentation.

4) Be More Energetic Than Ever

Speaking to large audiences requires you to be a more energetic version of yourself. Project your voice, sound excited, and make sure your passion for the topic comes through. The more energy you have, the more engaged the audience will be, and if you're excited, your audience will get excited. But if you're lame and boring, there's a good chance your audience will also be bored.

5) Give the Audience Time to React

When you're on a stage, a second or two of silence can seem like forever. But in reality, it's exactly what your audience needs. If you make a joke, give them a couple seconds to laugh. If you're showing an interesting statistic, give it a second to sink in. If you're trying to get across a complex or particularly important idea or concept, say it, pause, and then say it again. Giving your audience a few seconds to react or absorb the information you're giving them is one of the simplest things you can do to make your presentation instantly better.

6) Plan Audience Interaction

For smaller audiences, planned interaction is critical. It's a great way to get the audience engaged and demonstrate that you understand what they want to hear. Prepare questions to ask your audience, and time when you will pose the questions. However, be warned: the bigger the audience, the harder it is to ask them questions and expect a response. Plan ahead for all of your interaction based on the size of your audience.

7) Let the Audience Love You

In EVERY case, the audience desperately wants you to succeed on stage. In fact, they're actually afraid FOR you. If you've ever attended a session during which the speaker totally tanked, you know that it's intensely uncomfortable to watch someone choke on stage. So the more it looks like you're confident and having fun up there -- no matter what is going on in terms of tech glitches, getting stuck on your words, forgetting something, or whatever else it may be -- the happier and more satisfied your audience will be with your presentation. Remember: your audience has no idea what you plan to say, so if you mess up, they probably won't know you messed up. Be confident, and let them love you.

8) Make Sure Your Presentation Has "Ups and Downs"

Presentation design and training export Nancy Duarte writes a lot about this topic in her book, Resonate: Present Visual Stories That Transform Audiences, and it's a really great read. The basic premise is that, as a presenter, you can't constantly keep building your audience up and up during your presentation, and the best presentations have a key element: hope. In order to create hope, you need to provide your audience with "ups and downs." Specifically, you need to flip flop back and forth between the current problem you're addressing and the new solution you're offering to solve it.

Example:

The "Down": Buying emails lists and SPAMing them doesn't work.

The "Up": Building an opt-in email list will radically transform your email marketing.

9) Plan for Laughs and Applause

Your presentation is nothing short of a performance. As you're prepping and practicing for your talk, plan to do one session where you focus solely on when you should anticipate and pause to encourage audience reactions such as applause and laughter.

10) Know Your Surroundings

Whether you'll be presenting in a small boardroom or ginormous auditorium, you should try to know as much as possible about your surroundings ahead of time. How much space will you have to walk around? Will there be a confidence monitor available for you look at your slides without referring to the screen behind you? Where will your audience be sitting? Will you have a remote control to advance your slides? These are all important questions to answer to make you feel confident and amply prepared before you take the stage for real.

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These 10 commandments are useless without practice, and winging it will only get you so far. Just like you notice the design difference between an iPad and other tablets, it's easy to notice the polish of a presentation that has been practiced and refined. Practice in front of a mirror, or in a small group. Have a clear goal for each of your individual practice sessions. For example, in one practice session, you might work on your transitions between key points, whereas in another, you might work on the timing of your jokes.

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Less is More: Try to have only one point per slide. One or two strong graphic images or a succinct line of text will tell the story better than bullet points, or long paragraph of copy, complex graphics or charts. The audience needs to process what you're saying while at the same time absorbing your slide on the screen. So, rather than one complex slide, instead break it up into multiple slides, each with one main idea. This idea could be represented by a strong image, short phrases or data point.

 

Make sure you provide enough contrast between your content and the background. A simple background with solid color is best so it won't be distracting or overpowering and drown out your text or main image. The text should also be large enough to see from the back of the room.

Use strong visuals to support your message. Half of our brains are wired to process visual information. Like the old saying goes "a picture is worth a thousand words". So, instead of putting on the words on the slide, move them to the speaker note area or print handouts and instead find a strong image that captures the essence of your message and show that image instead. Otherwise, we tend to read ahead of the speaker and not fully pay attention to what he/she is saying. Use a photo to emotionally connect with the audience, engage them in a total immersive experience.

Always use high quality graphics either custom illustrations (think infographic type of imagery), or photos shot yourself or perhaps purchased professional stock photos (for example through either iStockphoto or ShutterStock). Don't just download an image from some website (beware of copyright issues) and then just stretch a small, low-resolution photo to make it fit your design causing the photo to show pixelation and lose its integrity. Our designers often use lifestyle images of people on the slides we designed for our clients, they tend to help connect with the audience on a more personal and emotional level.

Color evokes emotion...it helps persuade and motivate. Appropriate color usage can increase interest and improve comprehension and retention. Use your approved brand colors to help establish connection with your brand. Use cool colors (blue or green) in the background and warm colors (orange or red) in the foregrounds to make them pop. If you're presenting in a dark and large room, a dark background with light text (white or yellow) will work best. However, if you're presenting in a well lit room, then a light background with dark text should work better (dark background with light text tend to washout in a bright room).

Custom Designed Presentation: Design your own theme and templates, don't just use the standard templates included in PowerPoint. You want your presentation to represent your brand and professional image. Besides your audience expects a unique presentation, not cookie-cutter slides. Professional designed templates are available online or you can find well a qualified presentation company to help with your presentation. There're many great presentation companies out there so choose carefully and be sure to review samples of their past work. Remember, you only have one chance to make one great first impression.

Opening Intro or Animation: Use a short video or animation to engage your audience and get them excited about your presentation. It can be 20-60 seconds long and shouldn't be more than 2-3 minutes. Think of it as a movie teaser to pique the audience interest. You can create the animation in Flash and then insert it into to your PowerPoint presentation. Be sure to add appropriate scripts to help it auto-rewind and refresh the screen.

You can also add a Flash movie to your interior slides to help explain or convey a concept. See how we add interactive navigation menu on the right in our client's slide below to help bring up Google Earth video showing our client's plant location in various cities around the world.

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We hope these tips are helpful with your next presentation. If you ever need any help with your preparing a presentation for your next important meeting, our presentation design team will be glad to help. You can check out our presentation design and development services here.

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Visualbee's Path To Presentation Bliss

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No more than six words on a slide. EVER. There is no presentation so complex that this rule needs to be broken. [Also recommended in another post: No bullets. Use a separate slide for each sentence or idea.]

No cheesy images. Use professional stock photo images.

No dissolves, spins or other transitions.

Sound effects can be used a few times per presentation, but never use the sound effects that are built into the program. Instead, rip sounds and music from CDs and leverage the Proustian effect this can have. If people start bouncing up and down to the Grateful Dead, you’ve kept them from falling asleep, and you’ve reminded them that this isn’t a typical meeting you’re running.

Don’t hand out print-outs of your slides. They don’t work without you there.

Bad presentations are painful—for both the presenter dying a slow death in front of a crowd and the bored audience members who have to sit through…

Simplify

Lose the cliches

Information needs emphasis

Designate elements

Empathy for the audience

Use the 10/20/30 Rule to Avoid Disastrous PowerPoint Presentations

An oldie-but-goodie post from entrepreneur Guy Kawasaki directly addresses the kind of problems the military has with complex PowerPoint decks—boring … Read…

Less is more when it comes to presentations (except for font size): The 10/20/30 Rule recommends limiting the number of your slides to 10 and your presentation time to 20 minutes, but using at least a 30-point font size.

Those are the basic slideshow creation principles. Once you've got them down, take a look at how you can improve the design of your slides and the elements on them.

Enhance Your Presentation

PowerPoints and other presentation tools are visual aids. You want to connect how your slide looks to what you're saying. As Godin writes:P

The home run is easy to describe: You put up a slide. It triggers an emotional reaction in the audience. They sit up and want to know what you’re going to say that fits in with that image. Then, if you do it right, every time they think of what you said, they’ll see the image (and vice versa).P

To make your presentation stand out visually, use and choose these carefully:

Fonts: Use your own font instead of the default fonts on your computer. Smashing Magazine has a list of sources for free, quality fonts or you could buy a font at many other typography resources. Godin likens this to "dressing better or having a nicer business card. It's subtle, but it works."

Images: Professional quality images, rather than cheesy clipart, will make your presentation stand out. You can buy photos at sites like Getty Images or find a free stock photo using the Everystockphoto.com search engine.

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Diagrams and shapes: Simple graphics and diagrams can illustrate or highlight your information better than text can, but using them effectively can be tricky. This non-designer's guide to creating diagrams for slides will help you make sure the visuals you use for emphasis are consistent, appropriately sized, and otherwise communicate well. Similarly, choose the best chart for your data so you're presenting your information as clearly as possible.

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Visualbee's End to End Presentation Advice

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Structuring Your Talk:

Preparing a talk always takes far longer than you anticipate.  Start early!

Write a clear statement of the problem and its importance.

Research. Collect material which may relate to the topic.

Tell a story in a logical sequence.

Stick to the key concepts. Avoid description of specifics and unnecessary details.

If you are making a series of points, organize them from the most to the least important. The less important points can be skipped if you run short of time.

Keep your sentences short, about 10-20 words each is ideal. This is the way people usually talk.

Strive for clarity. Are these the best words for making your point? Are they unambiguous? Are you using unfamiliar jargon or acronyms?

Preparing Your Slides:

Presentation Design

Let the picture or graphics tell the story - minimize the use of text.

Don’t overload your slides with too much text or data.

FOCUS. In general, using a few powerful slides is the aim.

Type key words in the PowerPoint Notes area listing what to say when displaying the slide. The notes are printable.

Number your slides and give them a title.

Prepare an Agenda or Table of Contents slide. You can reuse the same slide at the end of the presentation by changing the title to Summary.

Prepare a company logo slide for your presentation.

You can add a logo and other graphics to every slide using the slide master feature or by adding them to the footer.

Proofread everything, including visuals and numbers.

Keep “like” topics together.

Strive for similar line lengths for text.

Visual elements

A font size of 28 to 34 with a bold font is recommended for subtitles. The title default size is 44. Use a san serif font for titles.

Use clear, simple visuals. Don’t confuse the audience.

Use contrast: light on dark or dark on light.

Graphics should make a key concept clearer.

Place your graphics in a similar location within each screen.

To temporarily clear the screen press W or B during the presentation. Press any key to resume the presentation.

Text

Font size must be large enough to be easily read. Size 28 to 34 with a bold font is recommended.

It is distracting if you use too wide a variety of fonts.

Overuse of text is a common mistake.

Too much text makes the slide unreadable. You may just as well show a blank slide. Stick to a few key words.

If your audience is reading the slides they are not paying attention to you. If possible, make your point with graphics instead of text.

You can use Word Art, or a clip art image of a sign, to convey text in a more interesting way.

Numbers

Numbers are usually confusing to the audience. Use as few as possible and allow extra time for the audience to do the math.

Numbers should never be ultra precise:

“Anticipated Revenues of $660,101.83” looks silly. Are your numbers that accurate? Just say $660 thousand.

“The Break Even Point is 1048.17 units. Are you selling fractions of a unit?

Don’t show pennies. Cost per unit is about the only time you would need to show pennies.

If you have more than 12-15 numbers on a slide, that’s probably too many.

Using only one number per sentence helps the audience absorb the data.

Statistics

Use the same scale for numbers on a slide. Don’t compare thousands to millions.

When using sales data, stick to a single market in the presentation. Worldwide sales, domestic sales, industry sales, company sales, divisional sales, or sales to a specific market segment are all different scales. They should not be mixed.

Cite your source on the same slide as the statistic, using a smaller size font.

Charts

Charts need to be clearly labeled. You can make more interesting charts by adding elements from the drawing toolbar.

Numbers in tables are both hard to see and to understand. There is usually a better way to present your numerical data than with columns and rows of numbers. Get creative!

PowerPoint deletes portions of charts and worksheets that are imported from Excel, keeping only the leftmost 5.5 inches. Plan ahead.

Backgrounds

Backgrounds should never distract from the presentation.

Using the default white background is hard on the viewer’s eyes. You can easily add a design style or a color to the background.

Backgrounds that are light colored with dark text, or vice versa, look good. A dark background with white font reduces glare.

Colors appear lighter when projected. Pale colors often appear as white.

Consistent backgrounds add to a professional appearance.

For a long presentation, you may want to change background designs when shifting to a new topic.

Excitement

Slides for business presentations should be dull! You don’t want to distract the audience.

Sounds and transition effects can be annoying. Use sparingly.

Animation effects can be interesting when used in moderation.

Too much animation is distracting.

Consider using animated clip art

Consider using custom animation

You can insert video and audio clips into PowerPoint.

You can also insert hyperlinks.

Hints for Efficient Practice:

Timing - Practicing Your Presentation,

Talk through your presentation to see how much time you use for each slide.

Set the automatic slide transition to the amount of time you want to spend discussing each slide.

Are you using the right amount of time per slide? Decide which slides or comments need alteration to make your presentation smoother.

Change the automatic slide transition settings for individual slides to fit the amount of time needed for that slide and practice again. Are you still within the time limit?

Decide if you want to remove the automatic slide transition feature before giving the presentation.

Content

Make a list of key words/concepts for each slide

Read through the list before you begin.

Don't attempt to memorize your text;

Your words will probably be different each time you practice.

Think about the ideas, and your words will follow naturally.

Delivering Your Talk:

Pre-Talk Preparation

Plan to get there a few minutes early to set up and test the equipment.

Dress appropriately for your audience.

Turn off your cell phone.

Handouts:

Edward Tufte, the leading expert on visual presentation techniques, advises speakers to always prepare a handout when giving a PowerPoint presentation.

Make about 10% more handouts than you expect to use.

Distribute handouts at the beginning of your talk.

Opening:

Jump right in and get to the point.

Give your rehearsed opening statement; don't improvise at the last moment.

Use the opening to catch the interest and attention of the audience.

Briefly state the problem or topic you will be discussing.

Briefly summarize your main theme for an idea or solution.

Speaking

Talk at a natural, moderate rate of speech

Project your voice.

Speak clearly and distinctly.

Repeat critical information.

Pause briefly to give your audience time to digest the information on each new slide.

Don’t read the slides aloud. Your audience can read them far faster than you can talk.

If you plan to write on the slides to emphasize key points during the presentation, practice ahead of time. To select the writing tool right-click during the presentation.

Body Language

Keep your eyes on the audience

Use natural gestures.

Don’t turn your back to the audience.

Don’t hide behind the lectern.

Avoid looking at your notes. Only use them as reference points to keep you on track. Talk, don’t read.

Questions

Always leave time for a few questions at the end of the talk.

If you allow questions during the talk, the presentation time will be about 25% more than the practice time.

You can jump directly to a slide by typing its number or by right-clicking during the presentation and choosing from the slide titles.

Relax. If you’ve done the research you can easily answer most questions.

Some questions are too specific or personal. Politely refuse to answer.

If you can’t answer a question, say so. Don’t apologize.  “I don’t have that information. I’ll try to find out for you.”

Length:

To end on time, you must PRACTICE!

When practicing, try to end early. You need to allow time for audience interruptions and questions.

 

Demeanor:

Show some enthusiasm. Nobody wants to listen to a dull presentation. On the other hand, don’t overdo it. Nobody talks and gestures like a maniac in real life. How would you explain your ideas to a friend?

Involve your audience. Ask questions, make eye contact, and use humor.

Don’t get distracted by audience noises or movements.

You’ll forget a minor point or two. Everybody does.

If you temporarily lose your train of thought you can gain time to recover by asking if the audience has any questions.

Conclusion:

Close the sale.

Concisely summarize your key concepts and the main ideas of your presentation.

Resist the temptation to add a few last impromptu words.

End your talk with the summary statement or question you have prepared. What do you want them to do? What do you want them to remember?

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Consider alternatives to “Questions?” for your closing slide. A summary of your key points, a cartoon, a team logo, or a company logo may be stronger.

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The ability to communicate well is an important skill for any student attending university. In addition, possessing excellent communication skills are highly valued in the workplace. This means, among other things, that you should be able to present your topic and research results fluently; for example, during seminars with peers or with managers and clients in the workplace 

A persuasive presentation not only require thorough preparation of content, but also good style. It takes quite a bit of skill to come across understandable for any particular audience and to stay in control of the situation. For this purpose, the following 10 tips may offer some guidance to help you on the way to delivering a memorable presentation.

1. Preparation, preparation, preparation

There is no easy way out. Giving a excellent presentation is all about the preparation that goes into it, and this theme applies to every single aspect you include in your presentation.

2. Think audience

When you are preparing your presentation, there is one thing you should always keep in the back of your mind: the audience. The sole purpose of a presentation is to communicate whatever you have to say to an audience. Position yourself being in their shoes and answer the following questions: who, what, why, how?

Who are they and who are you? It’s essential to know who your audience will be: are they your classmates, professors, professionals, etc. and what do they know about you. Do you need to inform them? Do you need to introduce yourself? Different audiences have different needs, and different audiences may need different communicative approaches.

What do they want? What do they know? What can I tell them? Knowing this information will help you decide what content to include in your presentation. If you are not sure about the answer to one of these questions, perhaps you may want to include it in your presentation.

Where can I take them? Your presentation is very much like a journey. Guide your audience through the content. Use signposts to indicate what you are presenting and where you are going. Examples of signposts are, “Next, I will discuss..”, “Now I’d like to move on to….”, and “Finally, …” or “To conclude..”. Signposts are also great tools to keep you audience awake, focused and engaged. Have you ever listened to a less engaging presentation and the presenter said, “Finally”, surely that was the moment you found yourself waking up. Use signposts throughout your presentation.

3. Communicate

A presentation is never a one way communication, despite the fact that you are the only one speaking. Communication is always two ways. Although you do not want your audience interrupting your speech, make it engaging: look at the audience, speak to the whole audience. Your audience wants to be spoken to. Ask rhetorical questions, use short pauses when you are, for example, changing the subject or moving on to another topic. Rhetorical questions will often raise the audience awareness as do pauses. Don’t hide behind a computer, a paper, or a desk

4. Prepare the little things

There is truth in the old saying “It’s the little things that count”. Often when we are preparing a presentation we prepare the content, the slides, the general story line, but it is often the little things that catch us off guard 

For example, how do you start your presentation? What do you say? In Estonian, as I understood, “Tere!” will almost always do. But what about in English or any other language for that matter? Do you say (or is it appropriate to say) “hello”, “hi”, “good morning/afternoon/evening everybody”, “dear audience”, etc.? How do you end? What do you say? E.g. “thank you”, “thank you for your attention”, etc. Prepare your signposts, “next”, “finally”, etc. Also, think of the specific terms you use to describe what is on your slide. Are you showing a picture, or more specifically a graph, table, chart, etc.?

5. Structure your presentation

The purpose and content needs to be carefully considered. How much detail can you cover in the allotted time? Going back to a point made earlier, what does your audience already know about your topic? What do they need to know, and more important, what is your take-home message? What do you want your audience to remember 

Most presentation will have an introduction, a body, and a conclusion. You introduce yourself in the introduction, your topic, and what you will cover during your presentation. Remember, this part can be as short as 30 seconds. The body will include key points, new knowledge, trends in your data, or progress to date. The level of detail may depend on the task and time available. Remember to signpost! Highlight the implications of your discussion or possible applications of your findings in your conclusion and finish with your take-home messages.

6. Finding your voice

Although there are general rules and structures, it is important to find your own voice. Know your strengths and weaknesses. For most of us, giving a presentation is a learning process and definitely not something we do on a daily, weekly or even monthly basis.

Therefore, stay in your comfort zone to give you confidence but push the boundaries: explore new techniques, try something different, use a different power point template, try using cue cards rather than reading from a paper, watch what others do and learn from them; try using a different tool such as Prezi. Set yourself a target. What kind of presenter do you want to be? Take your time, prepare, prepare, prepare.

7. Do not read or read like you mean it.

When giving a presentation, from a communication perspective, speaking is always better than reading. However, when you find yourself in the situation where you are going to read, there are a few techniques you can use to make it more enjoyable for the audience (remember your audience).

Always address the audience, even when reading. Make sure you take your eyes off the paper and look at the audience. Highlight parts in the text that you wish to stress, e.g. keywords, signposts, words that evoke, etc. Cut your A4 paper into four parts. The size of cuecards. They are less distracting to hold and most often preparing cue cards helps you to remember your presentation.

PowerPoint comes with a handy print function which allows you to print handouts. Use these so you have an overview which slides comes next. Do you know about the presenter’s view in PowerPoint? If you don’t, you should definitely check it out! If you go through these steps, you’ll often find that you actually don’t need to read.

8. Non-verbal communication

There is a lot to say about non-verbal communication, but what to do with you hands is the focus of this point. There are of course cultural differences as well as individual differences, but in general we use the motions of our hands and arms to support the content of our speech. Our hands also seem to get in the way when we are giving presentations. Where do we place them? What do we do with them? It’s easy when your holding a piece of paper, but can we put our hands in our pocket, or behind our back?

One of my favorite examples of good hand movement is the weather news on TV. You’ll see weather presenters usually holding a remote in front of their body, clasped in their hands, just above the waist. The best place to keep your hands. If you don’t have a remote, keep a pen, or pencil in your hands (be careful, though, not to break them).

9. Slide design

 

Another ten tips could be devoted on good slide design, but not this time. One essential criteria to remember is, however, the following: don’t put anything on a slide (text, images, pictures, tables, and graphs) if you are not going to talk about them, or mention them. It will only confuse your audience (unless they are either part of the template, or faded in the background).

 

In addition, respect your audience, do not overload your slides with text and read this text to them. Most likely your audience will have finished reading your text before you. Less is more and remember that you do not need to write in complete sentences on your slides.

10. Practice, practice, practice

Practice and time your presentation. Practice delivering you speech out loud. Record your presentation using the record tool available in PowerPoint. Practice delivering you presentation to an audience, for example, your peers. If you don’t have an audience, practice in front of a mirror.

If all fails and/or you are in need of more advice, you are more than welcome to drop by the Centre of Academic Writing and Communication (AVOK) for help, suggestions, comments, feedback, encouragements, and a wealth of resources to get you through your communication problems. You can find us at the following address, Jakobi 2-131, or contact us by email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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- See more at: http://blog.ut.ee/10-tips-for-a-good-presentation/#sthash.UiuS8yFn.dpuf

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Presentations are mostly practiced by students and professionals, and they are a great way to convey ideas as well as educate and convince people. Giving a presentation is not an easy task; it requires substantial research, organization, public speaking skills, and self-confidence. A good presenter has the ability to engage his or her listeners from beginning to end and compel them to take action. Those who wish to learn presentation skills can get training from expert presenters through classes or courses, or they can follow presentation tips that are available on the Internet. Here are some great tips and tricks for effective presentations, as well as links to related websites.

Here are three of our blog posts for presenters.

Public Speaking

Presentation Exercises

Two Minutes

Organizing Your Presentation

Choose an appropriate presentation structure: topical, chronological, classification by categories, problem and solution, or cause and effect.

Divide the body of your presentation into three to five main points.

The conclusion should include a summary of the main points of the presentation and leave the audience with something that is worth remembering and pondering.

Include questions in your presentation, which should be asked once every 10 minutes to engage the audience.

The final slide should contain a message thanking the audience, your contact details, and information about the availability of speaker notes, materials, and feedback tools.

Public Speaking Tips

Avoid slang and jargon.

Use anecdotes and practical examples to make complicated concepts more comprehensible.

Speak in varying tones and pitches to give emphasis to certain words and ideas.

Deliver your speech slowly and clearly.

Make sure that the people sitting at the back of the hall can hear you clearly, but do not speak so loud that it appears as if you are shouting.

Maintain an upright but relaxed posture while you are speaking, and do not lean forward or backward.

Leave your arms on the podium or by your sides when you are not using them to make gestures.

When gesturing, make sure that it is natural and spontaneous.

Maintain eye contact with the audience.

Wear clothes with simple cuts and neutral tones, and make sure that they are comfortable.

Presentation Design

Do not overload slides with a lot of text.

Use the PowerPoint Notes to remind yourself what to say when a certain slide is being shown.

Prepare a Table of Contents slide with the “Summary Slide” feature.

Include a slide that shows your company logo.

Arrange slides according to topics.

Try to make the length of text lines similar throughout the slide.

Recommended font for slide title is San Serif, and font size should be 44.

Font size for subtitles should be 28 to 34, with bold font.

Use dark font over light background and light font over dark background to enhance clarity.

Use graphics only when appropriate.

You can press “W” or “B” to clear the screen temporarily during your presentation, and resume the presentation by pressing “Enter”.

Charts, Facts, and Statistics

Use as few numbers as possible during your presentation, preferably, no more than 12 numbers, because they can cause confusion.

Try not to use more than one number in a sentence.

Round numbers up to the nearest whole number.

If you are showing sales statistics, you should concentrate on one market throughout your presentation.

Use a smaller font to cite sources for statistics.

Label all your charts clearly.

Use elements from drawing toolbar to create more attractive charts.

Numbers in charts can be difficult to view and understand.

Try to find ways other than columns and rows to present your data.

Take note that PowerPoint automatically deletes portions of charts imported from Excel, leaving only about 5 inches on the left.

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If you ever wanted to get good at your presentation skills, apart from using tools like Visualbee that can help you reduce the effort you put into visually appealling presentations, there are a few tips that you must utilise. These tips have been curated form some of the best presentation guru's out there to help you with the subject matter of your presentations as well as delivery. 

(1) Embrace constraints. Constraints and limitations are wonderful allies and lead to enhanced creativity and ingenious solutions that without constrains never would have been discovered or created. In the words of T.S. Eliot, "Given total freedom the work is likely to sprawl." There's no point complaining about constraints such as time, money, tools, etc. Your problem is what it is. How can you solve it given the resources and time that you have?

(2) Practice restraint. Any fool can be complicated and add more, it takes discipline of mind and strength of will to make the hard choices about what to include and what to exclude. The genius is often in what you omit or leave on the editing room floor.

(3) Adopt the beginner's mind. As the old saying goes, in the expert's mind there are few possibilities, but for one with the beginner's mind, the world is wide open. Designers understand the need to take risks, especially during early explorations of the problem. They are not afraid to break with convention. Good designers are open minded and comfortable with ambiguity early on in the process, this is how discoveries are made.

(4) Check your ego at the door. This is not about you, it's about them (your audience, customer, patient, student, etc.).  Look at the problem from their point of view -- put yourself in their shoes. This is not easy, it takes great amounts of empathy. Get in touch with your empathetic side. Empathy — an under valued "soft skill," can be a great differentiator and is key for truly understanding a problem.

(5) Focus on the experience of the design. It's not the thing, it's the experience of the thing. This is related to #4 above: Put yourself in their shoes. How do people interact with your solution? Remember that much of design has an emotional component, sometimes this is even the largest component (though users may be unaware of this). Do not neglect the emotional aspect of your solutions.

(6) Become a master storyteller. Often it's not only the design — i.e., the solution to a problem — that is important, but the story of it. This is related to #5 above. What's the meaning of the solution? Practice illustrating the significance of solutions both verbally and visually. Start with the general, zoom in to the detail, pull out again to remind us of the theme or key concept, then zoom back in to illuminate more of the detail.

(7) Think communication not decoration. Design — even graphic design — is not about beautification. Design is not just about aesthetics, though aesthetics are important. More than anything, design is about solving problems or making the current situation a little better than before. Design is not art, though there is art in design.

(8) Obsess about ideas not tools. Tools are important and necessary, but they come and go as better tools come along. Obsess instead about ideas. Though most tools are ephemeral, some of your best tools are a simple pencil and sketch pad. These are often the most useful — especially in the early stages of thinking — because they are the most direct. Good advice is to go analog in the beginning with the simplest tools possible.

(9) Clarify your intention. Design is about choices and intentions, it is not accidental. Design is about process. The end user will usually not notice "the design of it." It may seem like it just works, assuming they think about it at all, but this ease-of-use (or ease-of-understanding) is not by accident, it's a result of your careful choices and decisions.

(10) Sharpen your vision & curiosity and learn from the lessons around you. Good designers are skilled at noticing and observing. They are able to see both the big picture and the details of the world around them. Humans are natural pattern seekers; be mindful of this skill in yourself and in others. Design is a "whole brain" process. You are creative, practical, rational, analytic, empathetic, and passionate. Foster these aptitudes.

(11) Learn all the "rules" and know when and why to break them. Over the centuries, those who came before us have established useful and necessary guidelines — these are often called rules or laws and it's important to know them. Yet, unlike other kinds of laws, it may be acceptable to break them at times so long as you know why. Basic graphic design principles and rules are important and useful to know, yet most professionals today have a hole in their education when it comes to the fundamentals of graphic design. I try to do this a little bit with the book Presentation Zen Design to raise the design mindfulness and vocabulary of professionals who do not make a living in design per se, but who have a desire to get better.

This is not an exhaustive list (in fact, I started with about 25 items); there are many other things designers can teach us (and not only graphic designers as well). What is missing from this list? What would you add? Love to hear your ideas.

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We previously presented a great collection of influential presentations in this section of our blog. By now, you must have already got a good idea of how to create creditable and impactful presentations. In this section we bring to you a few more such presentations to inspire you for your own ones. Use Visualbee and your presentations will be just as good or perhaps even better than these ones:

Get Rich Quick:

http://www.slideshare.net/NowPosible/get-rich-quick-25310436

A very short and sweet presentation, the content keeps you moving. The presentation is in black and white but the pictures and the display make it a very unique one. There is no problem of glazed over eyes here.

Live On The Edge:

http://www.slideshare.net/NowPosible/live-on-the-edge

Here is another edgy and impactful presentation. Three words ‘help this person’ can transform a routine existence into a life bursting with rich details. They can transform your life, career and perspective. This presentation does not use many pictures but the contrasting text and background colour and size makes it interesting.

Five Writing Tips That Double Your Salary:

http://www.slideshare.net/NowPosible/five-writing-tips-that-can-double-your-salary

A useful and fantastic presentation which is direct and spot on. This is how every presentation should be- ‘to the point’. There is so much useful advice in such a tremendously short presentation. Conciseness is the soul of wit. The importance of pictures is clearly depicted in this presentation. This is how your presentation will turn out to be if you use a tool like Visualbee. 

5 Things I Wish I Knew Before Starting Up:

http://www.slideshare.net/Eacademy/5-things-i-wish-i-knew-before-starting-up

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Here is a short and crisp presentation to help you to avoid some common mistakes while starting up. It is a simple and straightforward presentation. It very meticulously explains that there are so many new things to master when starting a business, that it becomes overwhelming. The presentation uses thoughtful words and provides experiential wisdom to adhere to .A good play of font makes the presentation an eye catching one.

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Visualbee: Common Issues and Troubleshooting

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Most people do not really think about design and designers, let alone think of themselves as designers. But what, if anything, can regular people — teachers, students, business people of all types — learn from designers and from thinking like a designer? And what of more specialized professions? Can medical doctors, scientists, researchers, and engineers, and other specialists in technical fields benefit in anyway by learning how a graphic designer or interaction designer thinks? Is there something designers, either through their training or experience, know that we don't? I believe there is.

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Below are 10 things (plus a bonus tip) that I have learned over the years from designers, things that designers do or know that the rest of us can benefit from. When I speak around the world I often put up a slide that asks people to make as many sentences as they can beginning with the word "Designers...." The goal of this activity is to get people thinking about thinking about design, something most of us never do (it also gets people in the audience talking, loosening up a bit; always a good thing). The sentences they generate range from "Designers wear black" to "Designers use creativity and analysis to solve problems" to "Designers make things beautiful," and so on. (Click on the "Think like a designer" slide to see the 11 tips in slide format on Slideshare.net — feel free to use them if you like.)

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Visualbee: A Usage Guide

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Visualbee is very simple to use and can be a boon to your Powerpoint woes. This guide will show you how to use Visualbee to enhance your presentations.

You start off with putting down your slide content (text) in bullet points. Preferably precise and organized to begin with. Once you are done with this, clicking the Enhance Presentation button brings up different styles, categorised by different industries and artistic themes. As you may have noticed, we do have a paid version of Visualbee, however the free version still allows you to choose from a limited (but still varied) selection of styles, with the full range being unlockable upon upgrading to the premium or enterprise versions.

Once you've chosen your style, Visualbee very quickly converts all of your slides and provides a preview of what each one will look like. You can modify each enhanced slide by cycling through a few different layouts and by cycling through a images to illustrate the slide.

If you're happy with your results we would seriously recommend switching to the premium version. Once you're happy with the makeover, you can save the new presentation and continue editing it in Powerpoint if you want.
In case you're not particularly happy with the presentation that visulbee gives you, you could try a few things to make it better

• Try changing around the words or phrases you have used in your slides to more closely match generic searches for the same
• You could also use the Visualbee modified presentation as a platform to do much more with your slides, so once you have it, you could spend a lot more time to customize it to better suit your interests.
• You could also search Visualbee's database of images to custom select images and replace the ones Visualbee has found for you

We sincerely hope that Visualbee helps you in making better high impact presentation faster. If you still have any issues, please leave us some comments and we will be happy to guide you on improving your experience.

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Most of the content on this site is targeted specifically towards professional designers and developers, or at the very least those interested in getting started in this field. This post however, is for everyone that has ever created a presentation. Whether you’re a student, the leader of a self-help group, or a corporate executive pulling in six figures, the second you open up Powerpoint or Keynote, you become a designer whether you like it or not.

You’ve chosen a visual tool to communicate and should therefore take the time to learn a thing or two about visual communications. One of the major reasons for this, especially for people in the professional business world, is that your colleagues will subconsciously make judgements about you based on the visual appeal of your presentation.

Follow the ten tips below and see if you don’t start getting comments about your awesome presentation design skills. Just watch out, if your co-workers notice you getting good at it they’re likely to start asking for to help with theirs!

To illustrate this idea I opened up Powerpoint, grabbed an actual default theme at random and threw some type on it. This workflow is nearly identical to that of countless presentation designers and the result is a typical presentation slide that I’ve seen countless times throughout college and my career.

Here’s a design secret, this slide sucks; as do many of the default themes you’ll find in Powerpoint. Granted, they’ve definitely improved the offering in recent years and Keynote (Apple’s presentation software) has some awesome templates, but you shouldn’t view these as the go-to method but rather a last resort if you need to create a presentation in record time.

The point here is that something custom makes a much stronger statement. Your colleagues know and use the templates in Powerpoint and they’ll recognize immediately that you didn’t put any work into the aesthetics of the slides.

I know for non-designers leaving behind templates may seem a bit radical, but you can do it! Just be sure to read the other tips below before striking out on your own. Otherwise you might end up with something much worse that even the Microsoft designers could come up with (and that’s saying something).

Photography is one of the single best ways to make your presentation look awesome. It’s also one of the single best ways to make it lame. The “business people on white background” look is nice, but it’s overdone and tends to look a bit stock art-ish or flat out cliche.

Further, just because a picture is on a white background doesn’t mean it’s a good photo. Stop using ugly or awkward photography just to have something to put on the slide. Remember that no photo is better than a bad photo.

You don’t always need a fancy photo or crazy custom background to make a presentation look professional. Using a strong palette of solid colors can make for an awesome presentation.

The slide above is a perfect example of using very plain design and little effort to create something that actually looks really nice. Whether you’re a designer or not, you could make this right?

The key here is to be very cautious about your color choice. Something too bright bright and fun will blow the audience’s eyes out. Also make sure to use plenty of contrast in your secondary color. A crash course in color theory will go a long way.

If you need help building color palettes, check out the free tools below.

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Visualbee's Guide To Presentation Design

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Most of the content on this site is targeted specifically towards professional designers and developers, or at the very least those interested in getting started in this field. This post however, is for everyone that has ever created a presentation. Whether you’re a student, the leader of a self-help group, or a corporate executive pulling in six figures, the second you open up Powerpoint or Keynote, you become a designer whether you like it or not.

You’ve chosen a visual tool to communicate and should therefore take the time to learn a thing or two about visual communications. One of the major reasons for this, especially for people in the professional business world, is that your colleagues will subconsciously make judgements about you based on the visual appeal of your presentation.

Follow the ten tips below and see if you don’t start getting comments about your awesome presentation design skills. Just watch out, if your co-workers notice you getting good at it they’re likely to start asking for to help with theirs!

To illustrate this idea I opened up Powerpoint, grabbed an actual default theme at random and threw some type on it. This workflow is nearly identical to that of countless presentation designers and the result is a typical presentation slide that I’ve seen countless times throughout college and my career.

Here’s a design secret, this slide sucks; as do many of the default themes you’ll find in Powerpoint. Granted, they’ve definitely improved the offering in recent years and Keynote (Apple’s presentation software) has some awesome templates, but you shouldn’t view these as the go-to method but rather a last resort if you need to create a presentation in record time.

The point here is that something custom makes a much stronger statement. Your colleagues know and use the templates in Powerpoint and they’ll recognize immediately that you didn’t put any work into the aesthetics of the slides.

I know for non-designers leaving behind templates may seem a bit radical, but you can do it! Just be sure to read the other tips below before striking out on your own. Otherwise you might end up with something much worse that even the Microsoft designers could come up with (and that’s saying something).

Photography is one of the single best ways to make your presentation look awesome. It’s also one of the single best ways to make it lame. The “business people on white background” look is nice, but it’s overdone and tends to look a bit stock art-ish or flat out cliche.

Further, just because a picture is on a white background doesn’t mean it’s a good photo. Stop using ugly or awkward photography just to have something to put on the slide. Remember that no photo is better than a bad photo.

You don’t always need a fancy photo or crazy custom background to make a presentation look professional. Using a strong palette of solid colors can make for an awesome presentation.

The slide above is a perfect example of using very plain design and little effort to create something that actually looks really nice. Whether you’re a designer or not, you could make this right?

The key here is to be very cautious about your color choice. Something too bright bright and fun will blow the audience’s eyes out. Also make sure to use plenty of contrast in your secondary color. A crash course in color theory will go a long way.

0 0 1 512 2925 Home 24 6 3431 14.0Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE

If you need help building color palettes, check out the free tools below.

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In the previous two sections of this series, Visualbee carefully picked up some of the most noteworthy examples of great presentations and we are back here with some more. These high impact presentations are not just beautifully presented, but their message comes across very clearly with the help of great figurines. If you too want presentations that make an impression on your audience, then you might want to take inspiration from these astounding examples:

All consultants are EVIL:

Here is a splendid example of a fun and engaging presentation which people are sure to remember. A very cool WAKSTER Limited presentation, this one does not fail to grab the viewer’s attention. Some people think all consultants are evil and they offer a lot of reasons why. This presentation takes a humorous look at some of the reasons to why people hate consultants and then makes suggestions on how to recognize the consultants that can actually make a difference. The expressions from the figures are amazing but the positioning of the text on the slides makes the slides and the story even stronger.

Social Media strategy:

Here is a phenomenal use of images to explain the concept of social media strategy. A very inspiring example of a well done presentation, it is an excellent introduction to social media channels. Visualbee too aims at providing an amazing explanation of your concepts through a nicely built presentation. With big self-explanatory pictures and minimal text, this presentation interests the audience with its visuals. 

Simplify your future:

This presentation is simple and effective and doesn’t fail to leave a mark. With just 13 slides, this presentation gives audience the key to simplifying the future. The background images and color contrasted text used gives the presentation a peaceful touch.

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So here were a few more examples of high-impact presentations to help you stir your creativity. Focus on your presentation and content and leave the designing up to Visualbee as we will bring life to your presentation and make them just as amazing as these ones. Keep watching this space for more great examples.

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TOP 5 WAYS TO MAKE A GREAT PRESENTATION

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PowerPoint presentations are one of the best ways to support a speech, visualize concepts or direct attention on a particular subject. However, a bad presentation can result in the opposite. Badly designed slides with too much text or bad graphics can distract or worse, annoy the audience. Since Visualbee is dedicated to the cause of improving the design on your slides, we bring you a short guide that will help you design presentations with a professional look and concise content:

Make original slides:

Do not copy your slides from different sources on the internet. Try to make the design very basic and simple and pick an easy to read font. Carefully select font sizes for headers and text. Remember to add highlights, such as images or flow charts, etc. Beautify your presentation narrowly but nicely. Don’t let the design overshadow your message.

Practice:

A well-prepared and enthusiastic speech will help you to get to your audience. There are a few things that need to be considered for a good presentation. Be thorough with your slides and speak freely. Be confident, loud and clear. Don’t speak too fast and maintain eye contact with the audience. Also remember to dress appropriately. Business formal wear is always appropriate to wear.

KISS:

Keep IStraight and Simple. Mention keywords only. Remember that your slides are only there to support, not to replace your speech. Explain your data and only highlight keywords through your slides. If you read your slides, the audience will get bored and stop listening.

Add Images

Have more images in your slides than text. But do not use images to decorate! Images can be used to complement your message. Use images to visualize your presentation. A picture can say more than a thousand words. Tools like Visualbee understand exactly how to use images to enhance a PowerPoint presentation. Animations too can also prove to be powerful tools to explain concepts. A good animation can make the message stick with your audience.

Don’t be silly and focus on your target:

Use animations and media sparingly. Use animations to clarify a model or emphasize an effect. Your target that is your audience, defines the content of your presentation. For example, you won’t be able to teach school kids about the complicated matters of economy. However, you may be able to explain what economy is in the first place and why it is important.

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